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•  Fire Prevention Week

Smoke Alarm Facts

  • More than 3,000 people die in home fires each year in the United States; most of whom are in homes without a working smoke alarm.

  • According to the National Fire Protection Association, between 2003 -2006, almost two-thirds of home fire deaths resulted from fires in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms.

  • Almost three of five (60%) of reported home fire deaths in 2007 to 2011 resulted from fires in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms.

  • Working smoke alarms cuts the risk of dying in reported home fires in half.

  • In fires considered large enough to activate the smoke alarm, hardwired alarms operated 93% of the time, while battery powered alarms operated only 79% of the time.

  • When smoke alarms fail to operate, it is usually because batteries are missing, disconnected, or dead.

  • An ionization smoke alarm is generally more responsive to flaming fires and a photoelectric smoke alarm is generally more responsive to smoldering fires. For the best protection, or where extra time is needed, to awaken or assist others, both types of alarms, or combination ionization and photoelectric alarms are recommended.

  • Test smoke alarms monthly and change batteries at least once a year, or as instructed by manufacturer’s guide.

  • Replace all smoke alarms when they are 10 years old.